The Pizza Button, Japanese Pinching Eggs, New Optical Wine Grape Sorting Tech, and Canned Wine Out of Oregon

Flavorful World’s Friday Fourplay offers up a bite-sized tidbit of info on each of the four food- and drink-related things we found most interesting each week.

Image credit: iStrategyLabs
Image credit: iStrategyLabs

The Pizza Button

A prototype has been constructed for a device that will enable a single button depression to order up between one and five Dominos pizzas for delivery right to your door without you having to log onto your computer or place a phone call.  Called PiePal, this undoubted best possible usage of professional engineer time and resources is the work of D.C.-based iStrategyLabs, and they’re currently accepting beta tester applications.  Sign up here to make the supreme sacrifice of chowing down on the most easily-acquired pizza you’ll ever eat.  Do it in the name of science!

Via NPR The Salt

Image credit: RocketNews24
Image credit: RocketNews24

Akane Farms Pinching Eggs

Consumption of raw egg is a typical part of enjoying certain Japanese dishes.  Tsumande Goran (translated as “pinching egg” or “Give it a pinch”) is the name of an egg with a yolk whose outer membrane is so strong, one can pick it up with one’s fingers and hold it.  It’s currently on offer with a somewhat simple rice dish called Tamago Kake Gohan at a restaurant in Fukuoka prefecture by the name of Tamago Kake Gohanya Akane Nojo.  The eggs, said to be fresh-tasting, are certified by Japan’s Ministry of Health and Welfare (a thing that should but probably won’t alleviate any of the concerns certain people reading this may have about the bacterial dangers of consuming raw foods.)  Having eaten a few raw egg-topped Asian dishes in my time, I can’t say that I love either the taste or the texture that it imparts.  If, however, I were offered a bowl of food crowned with an egg that apparently hails from the planet Krypton, I would be hard pressed to decline the experience.

Via RocketNews24

Image credit: Public Domain
Image credit: Public Domain

Optical Wine Grape Sorting

German scientists have developed an automated process of sorting wine grapes by quality.  The technology will assess and sort the grapes by color (which corresponds to varying sugar levels in the grapes) as well as removing stems, insects, and leaves, its aim being to produce quality wines more affordably by reducing the necessity of manual harvesting.  The “Grape Sort” won’t debut until around Autumn 2014, but is already showing great promise in its processing, and inspiring (my apologies for these next two words) grape expectations (again, sorry about that; couldn’t help myself. Tried. Couldn’t.) all around.

Via Inside Science

Image credit: Foodbeast
Image credit: Foodbeast

Canned Wine, ‘Cause Why Not?”

Intent on shaking up the experience of enjoying wine, Union Wine Company, headquartered in Oregon, has made it possible for you to drink your chosen nectar of the vine out of cans.  Friendlier to the environment (not to mention more cost-effective) because the cans use less material, each can will hold an approximate two servings of wine.  Despite obvious questions surrounding the long-term effects of such packaging on the overall quality of the wine, I can’t wait to get my hands on a can of this stuff (though any “shaking up” that should precede one opening a can would seem ill-advised. Poor phrasing, that was.)

Via Foodbeast

*Mention of a product, good, or service in a Friday Fourplay posting should not be interpreted as an endorsement either from Anthony Beal or Flavorful World food and drink blog. Vendors are not notified ahead of time that their products/services will be featured, thus Flavorful World will at the time of posting have had no related interactions with said vendors or any sample of their products/services by which to judge them. As such, we have no idea what these vendors are like to work with, or about the quality of their merchandise and are unqualified to vouch for them as reputable. Our Friday Fourplay lists are posted in the simple spirit of our having come across something that looks and sounds engaging, and thinking that perhaps our readers will think so too; no more, no less. With that in mind, patronize these establishments and vendors at your own risk.
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