“Bruffins,” Refrigerators Making Coffee, Whole-Fish Sushi, and Tokyo’s Tiny (Robot) Dancers

Flavorful World’s Friday Fourplay offers up a bite-sized tidbit of info on each of the four food- and drink-related things we found most interesting each week.

Image credit: ABC News
Image credit: ABC News

Now shipping nationwide! It’s a meal! It’s a muffin! It’s a…a—what?

So-called because it crosses a brioche-like texture with the shape of a muffin, the “Bruffin™” is the latest pastry chimera to come out of NYC, which up until recently, was the only place one could obtain it. Its “meal-in-a-muffin” concept involves filling each bruffin with tasty world-inspired foods. Representing India, for example, is a bruffin filled with Masala curried chicken, chickpeas and paneer cheese, with a salmon, herbed goat cheese, spinach, and caper bruffin repping Sweden. Ingredients typical of French, Japanese, Moroccan, and other cuisines get their bruffin on as well in the 12-count assortments currently shipping frozen to wherever customs allows them to go. My stomach and taste buds are already dusting off their passports in anticipation.

Via Good Morning America

Image credit: GE Appliances / YouTube
Image credit: GE Appliances / YouTube

The Barista in Your Fridge

A collaboration between GE and Keurig has produced a refrigerator with a coffeemaker built into the door. Aside from its ability to make hot and cold water, the GE Café Series Refrigerator also contains a pod bay to be loaded with one’s choice of K-cup for a steaming hot cup of coffee in seconds. This seems like a wonderful counter space-saving idea (eliminating the need for a coffee machine to take up valuable kitchen surface real estate), and one can only hope a fridge that comes equipped with a toaster (for a bite to accompany one’s refrigerator-made coffee) is in the works as well.

Via Thrillist

Image credit: IT Media
Image credit: IT Media

Waste Not, Mottanai Not

Japanese kaitenzushi chain Kurazushi,has released a new whole-sardine sushi roll just in time for the Japanese festival known as Setsubun. Costing 350 yen, the wrap features one Hokkaido-sourced sardine (with spine removed), grated plum, and Japanese basil, along with vinegared rice and nori. The rolls cut an attractive visual, and while I’ve historically declined foods still in possession of eyes with which to judge me for devouring them, I’d give these a go without hesitation.

Via First We Feast

Image credit: Robi Cafe / YouTube
Image credit: Robi Cafe / YouTube

Tokyo’s Dancing Robot Pop-Up Café

Nothing improves the quality of a meal like tiny robots busting moves on every available surface around you while you eat. Recognizing this, Tokyo’s Robi Café has scattered plenty of the little groove thang-shakers throughout its establishment. Robi is a little robot that responds to an approximate 250 commands and has a little swing in its backyard, but stops short of otherwise directly influencing any meal or beverage you choose to enjoy. It retails for about $1500, making the entire restaurant, which is open only until February 8th seem less a café than a stage upon which Robi can strut his stuff and hopefully drum up some sales. In any event, when the whole robot apocalypse thing I’ve been (jokingly; lighten up!) predicting for years finally comes to pass, it’s nice to know that at least some of our new overlords will be adorable and have some moves.

Via Eater

*Mention of a product, good, or service in a Friday Fourplay posting does not constitute and should not be interpreted as an endorsement either from Anthony Beal or Flavorful World LLC. Vendors are not notified ahead of time that their products/services will be featured, thus Flavorful World will at the time of posting have had no related interactions with said vendors or any sample of their products/services by which to judge them. As such, we have no idea what these vendors are like to work with, or about the quality of their merchandise and are unqualified to vouch for them as reputable. Our Friday Fourplay lists are posted in the spirit of our having come across something that looks and sounds engaging, and thinking that perhaps our readers will think so too; no more, no less. With that in mind, patronize these establishments and vendors at your own risk.
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