Japan’s Kit Kat Sandwich, Tasteable U.K. Museum Art, Citrus-Flavored Eggs, and a $49K Easter Bunny

Flavorful World’s Friday Fourplay offers up a bite-sized tidbit of info on each of the four food- and drink-related things we found most interesting each week.

Image credit: www.Entabe.jp
Image credit: www.Entabe.jp

Break Me Off a Piece of That Kit Kat Sandwich

In a world that barrel-ages sriracha just because it can, and has felt it necessary to “deconstruct” everything from the pizza to the club sandwich, simplicity earns big points with me. And if perhaps too much simplicity lies in just unwrapping and devouring delicious chocolate wafer candy, I suppose the next most uncomplicated thing one could do would be to cover it with whipped cream and slide it between two slices of bread, right? Japanese fast food chain First Kitchen has done this very thing. Its Kit Kat Sandwich, made using special variety “Kit Kat for Cafe” candy (designed to be dipped in hot beverages), may be a limited edition item, but my curiosity about the taste of this undeniably photogenic sandwich knows no limits.

Via The Daily Meal

Image credit: Nick Ansell/PA
Image credit: Nick Ansell/PA

Taste The Art Love

The Tate Sensorium is a London museum experimenting with technology that will enable visitors to experience its artworks on a sensory level beyond the visual. Still seeking a scientist to help iron out all the particulars, the museum aims to allow visitors to taste the flavors associated with certain artworks in which food plays a prominent role. Innovations involving the likes of sound waves that create tactile sensations and immersive sound technology are also under way. I’ve said it before and will do so again: it certainly is an interesting time to be alive.

Via The Telegraph

Image credit: RocketNews24
Image credit: RocketNews24

Yuzu-Flavored/Scented Eggs. Yep, You Read That Right…

Yuzu Tama is the name given to a special variety of egg out of Japan’s Kochi prefecture. “Yuzu” being the name of a Japanese citrus fruit, and “tama” a shortened form of “tamago” (eggs), the unique eggs are so-called because they smell and taste of yuzu. In an all-natural process that involves adding yuzu peels to the chicken feed given to the hens producing them, the eggs are infused with the aroma and flavor of this fruit that is considered to be among the most delicious citrus fruit in Japan. I can hear the wheels turning in some of your heads now, pondering the potential awesomeness of using similar methods to infuse eggs with the taste and smell of bacon or ham. And while I agree there’s hardly a better egg-breakfast meat pairing to be considered, it still seems like a bad idea. Just sayin’.

Via Japan Info

 

Image credit: VeryFirstTo.com
Image credit: VeryFirstTo.com

The Bunny With the Diamond Eyes

Because surely, this is what Easter is all about, a bunny that will set you back $49,000 has been carved from Tanzanian chocolate and given diamonds for eyes. If you are so inclined, you can acquire all eleven pounds of the cuddly little critter at VeryFirstTo.com. Bunnies are cute. Chocolate is delicious. Diamonds are shiny.

Did I mention that it comes with a trio of gold leaf-bedecked chocolate eggs?

‘Cause, y’know…it’s got that going on too.

Via HuffPost Taste

*Mention of a product, good, or service in a Friday Fourplay posting does not constitute and should not be interpreted as an endorsement either from Anthony Beal or Flavorful World LLC. Vendors are not notified ahead of time that their products/services will be featured, thus Flavorful World will at the time of posting have had no related interactions with said vendors or any sample of their products/services by which to judge them. As such, we have no idea what these vendors are like to work with, or about the quality of their merchandise and are unqualified to vouch for them as reputable. Our Friday Fourplay lists are posted in the spirit of our having come across something that looks and sounds engaging, and thinking that perhaps our readers will think so too; no more, no less. With that in mind, patronize these establishments and vendors at your own risk.
%d bloggers like this: