Drinkable Cream Puffs, Stateside Floating Noodles, Origami Kitchen Utensils, and NSFW Cereals

Flavorful World’s Friday Fourplay offers up a bite-sized tidbit of info on each of the four food- and drink-related things we found most interesting each week.

Image: PR Times

Drinkable Dessert

Beard Papa might sound like a fitting nickname for a certain wine-loving food blogger, but it’s more than that. It’s also the name of a Japanese bakery known for its natural, fresh-baked cream puffs (so-named because its head baker had a fluffy white beard). In addition to having a winning franchise name, Beard Papa’s has partnered with Japanese food and beverage company Nagatanien to release a drinkable, canned version of its signature cream puffs. The dessert beverage made its debut on March 21st in select rail stations, but nationwide rollout is coming in late April. Words like “flaky” and “buttery” might seem out-of-place in a drink description, but if the beverage evokes the taste of Beard Papa’s premier choux crème, then those words are bound to come up.

Via Nerdist

Image: sethlui.com

This Meal’s All Up In The Air

Singapore’s Hana restaurant originated a dish called “Floating Noodles” that is part delicious meal and part optical illusion. The dish consists of a bowl of noodles, some of which get draped over a pair of chopsticks that appear to be hovering in the air unaided by human hands. The oft-imitated dish is said to be coming to the U.S. Earlier this week, Neptunes Raw Oysters and Seafood Bar in Artesia, CA rolled out three distinct versions of the gravity-defying dish. Whether you’re all in for chicken katsu, deep-fried soft shell crab, or garlic shrimp, you can enjoy them now with a steaming bowl of magic noodles without having to go all the way to Singapore (though Singaporean food is awesome, so if you went anyway, no one would blame you).

Via Eater

A Li’l Somethin’ to Fold

Because space is precious in kitchens and cooking areas, anything that conserves it is met with general applause. The Ori-Kit is a set of kitchen utensils―measuring spoons, colander, funnel, and spatula―each of which collapses into a flat surface when not folded to be used for its stated purpose. The washable, reusable, product, conceived in 2014, launches its Kickstarter campaign on April 7, 2017. [Video courtesy of Crowdcreate YouTube channel]

Via That’s Nerdalicious!

Image: Cereal Motel

When Sweets Go Salty

London-based Cereal Motel has released four “adult” breakfast cereals that are most certainly not for the kiddies, neither in name nor in box art. Each variety of the startup’s cereal, all of which are said to be inspired by pop culture,  music, film, art, and fashion, is a parody of an existing cereal brand (“Vice Krispies,” as one example, being a Rice Krispies analog that mashes up Cocoa Krispies with a popular movie title). Each box of the naughty nibbles sells for £9.99 (about $10.80 USD), making the price pretty “adult” also. Marketed as a “no-nonsense, bitch please brand of cereal,” it’s sure to raise unsuspecting eyebrows and require the use of a crowbar to pry tongue from cheek. But at least, as its website tells us, sinners eat for free at Cereal Motel.

Via Foodbeast

This article first appeared on FlavorfulWorld.com.

[Top image: sethlui.com]

*Mention of a product, good, or service in a Friday Fourplay posting does not constitute and should not be interpreted as an endorsement either from Anthony Beal or Flavorful World LLC. Vendors are not notified ahead of time that their products/services will be featured, thus Flavorful World will at the time of posting have had no related interactions with said vendors or any sample of their products/services by which to judge them. As such, we have no idea what these vendors are like to work with, or about the quality of their merchandise and are unqualified to vouch for them as reputable. Our Friday Fourplay lists are posted in the spirit of our having come across something that looks and sounds engaging, and thinking that perhaps our readers will think so too; no more, no less. With that in mind, patronize these establishments and vendors at your own risk.
%d bloggers like this: